Remembering David Hussman

Remembering David Hussman

We were sad to hear that David Hussman passed away yesterday, after being diagnosed with terminal lung cancer last year. A short bio would be difficult, so here are 3 links:

  1. Obituary in the Star Tribune
  2. The Dude Abides – Jim Walsh wrote this in-depth article about David last year in the Southwest Journal
  3. Honoring David Hussman – DevJam has a page on their website with articles and other information about David
Nate Knatterud-Hubinger and David Hussman at Mano a Mano's annual event in 2010.

Nate Knatterud-Hubinger and David Hussman at Mano a Mano’s annual event in 2010.

David Was a Dedicated Supporter of Mano a Mano

Hussman Tweet
About this time a year ago, DevJam hosted a party for friends and colleagues of David, as a chance to gather together and share stories; Mano a Mano’s Executive Director Nate Knatterud-Hubinger sent this note for the party:

“I was trying to think of a specific story about David, but the main thing that immediately pops in my head is just how pleasant and enjoyable he is to be around. I first met David around 2010, and he has been a steadfast part of my nonprofit organization Mano a Mano since then. We named him our 2011 Volunteer of the Year, he and DevJam have been actively involved in many projects and events every year, and I’ve spent dozens of hours at DevJam and Studio 2 over the years. Every time I’m there, it’s something I’ve looked forward to and enjoyed – which is not a normal experience for me with IT/tech-related projects or people – and that’s in large part thanks to David. He’s simply a really good dude (had to get a dude reference in there!).”

Our thoughts are with David’s wife Andrien Thomas, his 2 daughters, and his family & friends today.

3 New Clinic Projects Dedicated in Bolivia

3 New Clinic Projects Dedicated in Bolivia

Over the past 3 months, our counterpart organization Mano a Mano Bolivia has completed 3 new clinic projects:

  • a new clinic in Jatun Mayu (our 163rd clinic project in Bolivia)
  • a clinic expansion in Candelaria (our 164th clinic project)
  • a new clinic in Villa Rosario (our 165th clinic project)

The Jatun Mayu clinic was a collaboration with the local municipality and community, Mano a Mano, and a number of Rotary Clubs in the Upper Midwest (you can see a full list of Rotary Clubs here).

The projects in Candelaria and Villa Rosario were a collaboration with the local municipalities and communities, Mano a Mano, and Medical Educators for Latin America (MELA).

Mano a Mano’s Clinic Program

With the new clinics, medical professionals working in the community will have a much more comfortable working environment (which is very important for retaining staff in isolated rural communities), and community residents will have regular access to quality health care services provided through the Bolivian Health Ministry.

Our clinic program’s approach is that health outcomes can be dramatically improved with simple yet effective interventions, beginning with the basic ability to consistently access quality services in their own communities.

A continuing health education course held earlier this year at Mano a Mano Bolivia's office in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

A continuing health education course held earlier this year at Mano a Mano Bolivia’s office in Cochabamba, Bolivia.

As a Mano a Mano clinic, it will have Volunteer Health Promoter Training and Continuing Health Education workshops provided through our counterpart organization Mano a Mano Bolivia; it will also receive equipment and supplies to ensure that it is fully-furnished, and is connected with Mano a Mano Bolivia medical staff via radio for help with any difficult cases or issues.

Jatun Mayu Clinic

Jatun Mayu_163

Candelaria Clinic Expansion

Candelaria_164

Villa Rosario Clinic

Villa Rosario_165

Mano a Mano Speaker Series: Nate Knatterud-Hubinger on August 14th

Mano a Mano Speaker Series: Nate Knatterud-Hubinger on August 14th

The fifth talk of our Speaker Series is with Mano a Mano Executive Director Nate Knatterud-Hubinger; his talk will be on ”Working in International Development: Thoughts and Lessons Learned From Over a Decade With Mano a Mano International in Minnesota.”

  • WHAT: Mano a Mano Talk Series - ”Working in International Development: Thoughts and Lessons Learned From Over a Decade With Mano a Mano International in Minnesota” with Mano a Mano Executive Director Nate Knatterud-Hubinger
  • WHEN: Tuesday, August 14 from 6:30pm to 7:45pm
  • WHERE: Mano a Mano International, 925 Pierce Butler Route, St. Paul, MN 55104
  • RSVP: Please RSVP by Email or Phone to the Office (email: carmen@manoamano.org, phone: 651-457-3141)

Sustainability of Mano a Mano Projects

Sustainability of Mano a Mano Projects

Mano a Mano has completed more than 300 projects, with a number of new projects underway at any given time. Every new project is a direct request from each community, and they are an active participant throughout the process. There are hundreds of communities on our waiting list for projects, and we are trying to meet the high demand as our resources allow us to.

But the most important aspect of these projects for Mano a Mano is the sustainability of projects that have been built; we want to ensure that anything that we build is used efficiently, is used for its intended purpose, and is in use for a long time. Every Mano a Mano project that has been built continues to be in operation.

One of Mano a Mano’s basic philosophies in our community-based development model is to provide the most basic needs for communities – clinics, schools, roads, water projects, aviation runways, agricultural tools and training – that can serve as a springboard for other projects. (For an example of this, watch this video about our road project in El Palmar, Bolivia.)

Children taking a boat for a ride on the Ucuchi Water Reservoir, part of the San Isidro Ecotourism Park. Photo Credit: Jose Rocha and Los Tiempos

Children taking a boat for a ride on the Ucuchi Water Reservoir, part of the San Isidro Ecotourism Park. Photo Credit: Jose Rocha and Los Tiempos

As part of a workshop, Mano a Mano staff demonstrate the microorganisms that live in different kinds of soil.

As part of a workshop at the CEA, Mano a Mano staff demonstrate the microorganisms that live in different kinds of soil.

2017 Annual Report

This post is excerpted from Mano a Mano’s 2017 Annual Report, which you can read in its entirety here.

2017 in Pictures (Click Here to View the Album in Facebook)

Families Benefiting from the Wirkini Water Reservoir

Families Benefiting from the Wirkini Water Reservoir

Paulino Rocha Gonzales, 44 years old, married with 4 children living in Iluri Grande, Tiraque Province, is a direct beneficiary of the waters made possible by the Wirkini reservoir.

He mentions that the water in the reservoir is currently full, with the excess water flowing through the overflow channel. People irrigate their plots only using the overflow water – so far the outflow valve for the outlet pipe of the reservoir has not been opened.

Paulino says:

“the lands were previously not in production due to lack of water; now, all of those lands are cultivated with potatoes, corn, peas, beans, barley, oats, and wheat. In the past nobody wanted to buy these lands; even those with some available irrigation sold for minimal prices. Now, nobody wants to sell land, and everyone wants to buy because they are assured of irrigation water from the reservoir.”

The beneficiaries of the Wirkini reservoir, more than 340 families, are happy with the reservoir water and happy that the reservoir overflows every year. They thank Mano a Mano for our collaboration.

The Wirkini Water Reservoir was completed in October 2016 and quickly filled with about 20 feet of water (top picture). By March 2017 the water was 50 feet deep (bottom picture).

The Wirkini Water Reservoir was completed in October 2016 and quickly filled with about 20 feet of water (top picture). By March 2017 the water was 50 feet deep (bottom picture).

Wirkini Residents Talk About the Reservoir and the Impact it Will Have for Them

Video Credit: William Wroblewski

More Information about the Wirkini Water Reservoir

Mano a Mano Water Projects

The Wirkini project joins Mano a Mano’s 8 other large-scale water retention projects that benefit 131,062 people throughout Bolivia (51,062 directly). Our first water reservoir was built in Ucuchi, Bolivia in 2005 (this reservoir in Ucuchi is the other project featured in the video above) and has been consistently providing water to the community for more than a decade, even in times of drought like Bolivia is currently experiencing. We are expecting the Wirkini reservoir to work as well as the Ucuchi reservoir, for many years to come.